Discussion
Started 5th Oct, 2018

What types of inductive teaching for mathematics are out there?

I have been looking at different types of inductive teaching for mathematics. These include inquiry-based, discovery, problem-based, project-based, case-based, just-in-time, and a hybrid of project and problem-based.
Is there an inductive teaching approach or curriculum that uses everyday topics and students learn the mathematics needed to understand different pieces of it? For example, a class is discussing gardening. So the students learn how to calculate area of their garden. Then they look at mixture problems (fertilizer and soil). Then they see how Fibonacci plays into petals and seed patterns.
It doesn't quite fit one of the inductive teachings exactly. I think it is a combination of several.
Who has done research on this? Who/what should I be looking for?

Most recent answer

28th Jun, 2020
Abdelkader Mohamed Elsayed
Benha University - Dhofar University
The paper included in this link explains the induction in detail:

All replies (9)

7th Oct, 2018
Frederic Fovet
Royal Roads University
The issue is perhaps that you are seeking out tools when tools themselves are not inherently 'inclusive'. It is never simply a checklist. You'd need to look at the objectives you are trying to reach. Inclusion has several distinct theoretical foundations and you'd need to clarify which you adhere to (social capital, Rights based, neuro-cognitive, social model of disability, philosophical, etc.). Then there are distinct models to achieve these objectives, with differentiation and UDL being present at the forefront. These two frameworks will use a multitude of tools to reach their inclusive goals, depending on grade, subject content, culture of the school, experience of the teacher, etc. You'll need to embrace this relative flexibility as 'one size fits all" is not an option here. Inclusion is a destination and there are varied pathways to achieve this, depending on context.
1 Recommendation
10th Oct, 2018
Andrija Kozina
University of Zagreb
Dear Lenuel Hernandez,
I am read an interesting article about your topic. Maybe it old but I think it is useful for your research.
A. Duncan Yocum (1913) A FIRST STEP IN INDUCTIVE RESEARCH INTO THE MOST EFFECTIVE METHODS OF TEACHING MATHEMATICS, School Science and Mathematics 13 (3) (pp 197-210).
I hope I have been of some help.
Best
Andrija
10th Oct, 2018
Peter Samuels
Birmingham City University
Try searching for project calc from Duke University.
10th Oct, 2018
Lenuel Hernandez
Wayne State University
Andrija Kozina , Thank you for sharing this article. It is an interesting article about inductive research, not inductive teaching. There are some components that I find interesting and will do more reading. Hopefully it's not a rabbit hole. I also looked up other article by A. Duncan Yocum. He has some other articles that may be of interest to me. Thanks again for sharing.
10th Oct, 2018
Lenuel Hernandez
Wayne State University
Peter Samuels , Thanks for letting me know about the Project Calc from Duke. I went to their website and read up on this project. I am looking for work that allows students to develop questions about their surroundings and learning the mathematics needed to answer that question (be it calc, trig, algebra, geometry, etc.). It seems like Project Calc is specific to calculus. I plan to reach out to the developers and ask about their research into the development of the project. Thanks again!
20th Apr, 2020
Abdelkader Mohamed Elsayed
Benha University - Dhofar University
I agree with Dr, Frederic Fovet .
20th Apr, 2020
Abdelkader Mohamed Elsayed
Benha University - Dhofar University
Views differed on induction, so there are those who place it within the direct approach, and there are those who place it within the types of discovery, according to the role of both the teacher and the learner. For you, you can look for a discovery-based induction or a combination of several types of discovery.
1 Recommendation
28th Jun, 2020
Abdelkader Mohamed Elsayed
Benha University - Dhofar University
Opinions differed about induction, some scholars classified it as a direct entry to education, and others classified it as an exploratory approach, but what I would like to clarify here is that this classification depends on the role of both the teacher and the learner in the educational process.
Can you contribute to the discussion?

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